All posts by Father David Nix

Padre’s Platinum List

People have been asking me for my favorite books in one single blog post. Here’s a short “best-of” list.

NB:  I hesitantly use Amazon Prime as it does not fulfill Catholic social teaching on subsidiarity.  Thus, I’m not going to hyperlink these books. You will have to do your own research to find them.  That way, you can use whatever market you want.

How to Pray

Conversation with Christ by Fr. Rohrbach

Best book on Mary

The World’s First Love by Archbishop Fulton Sheen

Best histories of the Catholic Church

The History of Christendom by Warren Carroll (long at six volumes coming to about 5,000 pages)


Triumph (short, coming to about 500 pages)

 

Best Audio books:

Killing Jesus by Bill O’Reilly (Don’t worry, you don’t have to like his politics to find this is a phenomonal book on the Roman and Jewish history that led up to Christ’s crucifixion.)

Mother Angelica, written and read out loud by Raymond Arroyo who does an imitation of Mother Angelica as good as, um, Mother Angelica.

Best fiction

Island of the World by Michael O’Brien

Best saint accounts

Short:  St Mary of Egypt by St. Zosima himself (linked here on Evernote)


Long:  Ignatius of Loyola: The Pilgrim Saint

Best children’s catechism (tie)

Baltimore Catechism


Catechism of Perseverance

Best Chastity talk

Green Sex by Jason Evert

Best book on dogma

Fundamentals of Catholic Dogma by Ludwig Ott

Best book on the Eucharist

Jesus and the Jewish Roots of the Eucharist by Dr. Brandt Pitre

Best book on the Sacrifice of the Mass

Nothing Superfluous by Fr. James Jackson FSSP

Best beginning-evangelization book

Made for More by Curtis Martin

Best book on Salvation History

A Father Who Keeps His Promises by Dr. Scott Hahn

Best short book to understand the redemption

Dialogues by St. Catherine of Siena (actually God the Father’s words to  His own Divine Son.)

Best Spiritual Read

Introduction to the Devout Life by St. Francis De Sales (Make sure to get this unabridged version translated by Ryan)

Best Ascetical Theology

Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange (long)

Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange (short)

Best Apologetics book

Handbook of Catholic Apologetics by Fr. Tacelli and Dr. Peter Kreeft

Best book on how to be a Man

Be a Man by Fr. Larry Richards

Best pro-life resource

Pro-Life Pastoral Handbook by Brian Clowes

Best resource for adult-survivors of child sexual abuse

Wounded Heart by Dr. Dan Allender

Best book on how to forgive

Left to Tell by Immaculée Ilibagize (the new-age guru-clown Dr. Wayne Dyer only gave the forward.  She is a living saint.)

Best movies to understand the priesthood

I Confess by Alfred Hitchcock


Diary of a Country Priest, from the book by Georges Bernanos

Best traditional Catholic music

Female:  Benedictine Nuns of Ephesus


Male:  Solesmes Gregorian Chant

Best books on Deliverance and Exorcism

This is the only book I would recommend you get curious family and friends who are probably not living a life that is free of habitual mortal-sin.  It is called An Exorcist Tells His Story and it is by the former chief-exorcist of Rome, Fr. Gabriele Amorth,  who died in 2016, God rest his soul.


My suggestion for lay people who are living in grace and already praying a daily Rosary: Deliverance Prayers for the Laity by Fr. Ripperger

For priests doing deliverance ministry but not full exorcism:

Minor-Exorcisms and Deliverance Prayers by Fr. Ripperger

Best full-theology on Exorcism and demons:

Exorcism and the Church Militant by Fr. Thomas Euteneuer. 1


  1. A private-donor friend of mine will give a copy of this book to any priest who writes me an email requesting this book. Sorry, no lay people on this offer, but you can still purchase the book on Amazon.

Lead Us Not Into Temptation

There has recently been some debate on the last line of the Our Father:

And lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.—Matthew 6:13

Should the Our Father read “lead us not into temptation” as it has always been translated or the modern “let us not fall into temptation”? Let’s look at the Greek. The Greek of Matthew 6:13a is καὶ μὴ εἰσενέγκῃς ἡμᾶς εἰς πειρασμόν.  Word-by-word, it is καὶ (and) μὴ (not) εἰσενέγκῃς (to bring/lead) ἡμᾶς (us) εἰς (into) πειρασμόν (temptation.)—Matthew 6:13

Notice that the verb εἰσενέγκῃς (pronounced ace-in-egg-ace) is the active verb translated as bring or lead.  On the other hand, the whole idea of “let us not fall into temptation” is still technically an active verb in the English denotation, but very passive in the connotation.  Of course, God tempts no one:  Let no one say when he is tempted, “I am being tempted by God,” for God cannot be tempted with evil, and He himself tempts no one. But each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire.—James 1:13.

But if God tempts no one, then why would we ever ask God not to lead us into temptation?  Since God always wills our good, wouldn’t it be better to simply ask God not to let us fall into temptation?

No.

Why?  Because Jesus said lead them not into temptation in the Aramaic of the Our Father.  How do I know that Jesus said lead in the Aramaic?  Because the Holy Spirit inspired the Greek to say lead (εἰσενέγκῃς.) But if you won’t grant me the premise of inerrancy in the Scripture, then all blog posts on this topic are giant piles of poop, including this one.  None of it matters.

But since the Bible is true……I’m all the more amazed how many good Bible-believing Catholics continue to ask me (after I explained the Greek to them) if it were still not better to ask of God that He not let us fall into temptation, rather than not leading us to evil, especially since God always wills our good.

Well, Jesus still got it right. Here’s why: “Let us not fall into temptation” is still technically an active verb in the English denotation, but very passive in the connotation.  (Think about it:  let me not…) So, for the sake of brevity, we’re going to label that business of let not fall into temptation as passive.  Of course, lead us not into temptation is a negation of an active verb, but it’s still obviously an active verb being used: lead.

Why in the world does it matter if the verb that we speak to God-the-Father has Him doing something passive or active?  Because a female deity has a passive role, whereas a male deity has an active role. It was the one God of the Universe (not me) who chose to reveal Himself as Father.  And the Father never takes a passive role in our spiritual warfare or our salvation.

You see, to your mother, you might say, “Don’t let me fall into the bathtub.”

To your Dad, while hunting, you might say “Don’t lead me to the beasts I can’t handle.”

Thus, Jesus got it right when he taught us the Our Father.

(Still, I’m pretty sure that the infinite, eternal Divine Word doesn’t need my stamp-of-approval on that.)

1

  1. Just for the record, I do not think that these translation problems are new in the Church. The Creed in Greek has Jesus descending into “the depths” (of the Hebrew Sheol) but the ancient Church [erroneously?] translated it into the Latin as “hell” (as in the Hebrew Gehenna.) I am open to correction, but I think this was a horrible translation that even remains in the Traditional Latin Mass in Latin. This ancient error has led modernist theologians to teach that Jesus emptied hell on Holy Saturday. The truth of our dogma, however, is that Christ descended to the limbo of the patriarchs to bring them to heaven. So, people messing up doctrine by getting translation wrong 1500 years ago is still a serious problem. Notice that my blog post does not mention any Pope or Vatican II. This is an ancient problem. So, I’m very much against getting doctrinal language wrong, because when we get doctrinal language wrong, people’s faith gets messed up, too. That’s why I found this worthy of a blog post. Try to see past the current news in my blog posts.

Trent on the Holy Eucharist

“Everyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a woman divorced from her husband commits adultery.”—St. Luke 16:18

“For anyone who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment on himself.”—1 Cor 11:29

“For no crime is there heavier punishment to be feared from God than for the unholy or irreligious use of the Eucharist.”—Council of Trent, Chapter 6 on the Eucharist

The Nine Ways of Being an Accessory to Another’s Sin:

  1. By counsel
  2. By command
  3. By consent
  4. By provocation
  5. By praise or flattery
  6. By concealment
  7. By partaking
  8. By silence
  9. By defense of the ill done

TLM Class 3

The six links of this podclass are:

  1. Conversation With Christ to learn how to meditate as St. Teresa of Avila and St. Ignatius of Loyola.
  2. Moveable Feasts pdf of the Traditional Calendar from 2000 to 2050
  3. YouTube Traditional Latin Catholic Mass: Easter Sunday by Fulton Sheen
  4. iMass app
  5. St. Francis De Sales’ meditations on the parts of the Mass
  6. Nothing Superfluous by Fr. James Jackson

The seven sections of the 1962 family Missal are:
1: Devotionals
2: Sundays in Advent and Lent (and Moveable Feasts)
3: Sundays after Pentecost (and Moveable Feasts)
4: Ordinary/Roman Canon and Prefaces (Baronius has prefaces before Ordinary)
5: Common Masses
6: Saints and Immovable Feasts
7: Votive Masses and Devotionals

Incense Diagram: