Tag Archives: Doctrine

Heresy Podcast: 4th century Arians vs. St. Athanasius

This podcast considers the heresy of Arius and how St. Athanasius (featured image on blog, feast day 2 May) promoted the faith that is One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic. That Christ is homoousian (of one substance or one in being) with the Father is the true and orthodox view.  Heterodox or heretical views include homoiousian (that the Son is of a similar substance to the Father but not the same) and homoian (that the Son is similar to the Father, in all things, without speaking of substance) and heteroousian (that the Son is of a different substance from the Father, that is, created, as Arius wrongly taught.)  But again, the orthodox teaching is that God the Father and God the Son and God the Holy Spirit are homoousian or one in being as found in the Athanasian Creed, below in both English and Latin below.

Athanasian Creed in English:
Whosoever will be saved, before all things it is necessary that he hold the Catholic Faith. Which Faith except everyone do keep whole and undefiled, without doubt he shall perish everlastingly. And the Catholic Faith is this, that we worship one God in Trinity and Trinity in Unity. Neither confounding the Persons, nor dividing the Substance. For there is one Person of the Father, another of the Son, and another of the Holy Ghost. But the Godhead of the Father, of the Son and of the Holy Ghost is all One, the Glory Equal, the Majesty Co-Eternal. Such as the Father is, such is the Son, and such is the Holy Ghost.

The Father Uncreate, the Son Uncreate, and the Holy Ghost Uncreate. The Father Incomprehensible, the Son Incomprehensible, and the Holy Ghost Incomprehensible. The Father Eternal, the Son Eternal, and the Holy Ghost Eternal and yet they are not Three Eternals but One Eternal. As also there are not Three Uncreated, nor Three Incomprehensibles, but One Uncreated, and One Incomprehensible. So likewise the Father is Almighty, the Son Almighty, and the Holy Ghost Almighty. And yet they are not Three Almighties but One Almighty.

So the Father is God, the Son is God, and the Holy Ghost is God. And yet they are not Three Gods, but One God. So likewise the Father is Lord, the Son Lord, and the Holy Ghost Lord. And yet not Three Lords but One Lord. For, like as we are compelled by the Christian verity to acknowledge every Person by Himself to be God and Lord, so are we forbidden by the Catholic Religion to say, there be Three Gods or Three Lords. The Father is made of none, neither created, nor begotten. The Son is of the Father alone; not made, nor created, but begotten. The Holy Ghost is of the Father, and of the Son neither made, nor created, nor begotten, but proceeding.

So there is One Father, not Three Fathers; one Son, not Three Sons; One Holy Ghost, not Three Holy Ghosts. And in this Trinity none is afore or after Other, None is greater or less than Another, but the whole Three Persons are Co-eternal together, and Co-equal. So that in all things, as is aforesaid, the Unity in Trinity, and the Trinity in Unity, is to be worshipped. He therefore that will be saved, must thus think of the Trinity.

Furthermore, it is necessary to everlasting Salvation, that he also believe rightly the Incarnation of our Lord Jesus Christ. For the right Faith is, that we believe and confess, that our Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, is God and Man.
God, of the substance of the Father, begotten before the worlds; and Man, of the substance of His mother, born into the world. Perfect God and Perfect Man, of a reasonable Soul and human Flesh subsisting. Equal to the Father as touching His Godhead, and inferior to the Father as touching His Manhood. Who, although He be God and Man, yet He is not two, but One Christ. One, not by conversion of the Godhead into Flesh, but by taking of the Manhood into God. One altogether, not by confusion of substance, but by Unity of Person. For as the reasonable soul and flesh is one Man, so God and Man is one Christ. Who suffered for our salvation, descended into Hell, rose again the third day from the dead. He ascended into Heaven, He sitteth on the right hand of the Father, God Almighty, from whence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead. At whose coming all men shall rise again with their bodies, and shall give account for their own works. And they that have done good shall go into life everlasting, and they that have done evil into everlasting fire. This is the Catholic Faith, which except a man believe faithfully and firmly, he cannot be saved.


Symbolum S. Athanasii

Quicúmque vult salvus esse, *
ante ómnia opus est, ut téneat cathólicam fidem:
Quam nisi quisque íntegram inviolatámque serváverit,
absque dúbio in aetérnum períbit.

Fides autem cathólica haec est: *
ut unum Deum in Trinitáte, et Trinitátem in unitáte venerémur.
Neque confundéntes persónas, *
neque substántiam seperántes.
Alia est enim persóna Patris, alia Fílii, *
alia Spíritus Sancti:

Sed Patris, et Fílii, et Spíritus Sancti una est divínitas,
aequális glória, coaetérna maiéstas.

Qualis Pater, talis Fílius, *
talis Spíritus Sanctus.

Increátus Pater, increátus Fílius, *
increátus Spíritus Sanctus.
Immènsus Pater, imménsus Fílius, *
imménsus Spíritus Sanctus.
Aetérnus Pater, aetérnus Fílius, *
aetérnus Spíritus Sanctus.
Et tamen non tres aetérni, *
sed unus aetérnus.

Sicut non tres increáti, nec tres imménsi, *
sed unus increátus, et unus imménsus.

Simíliter omnípotens Pater, omnípotens Fílius, *
omnípotens Spíritus Sanctus.

Et tamen non tres omnipoténtes, *
sed unus omnípotens.
Ita Deus Pater, Deus Fílius, *
Deus Spíritus Sanctus.

Et tamen non tres dii, *
sed unus est Deus.

Ita Dóminus Pater, Dóminus Fílius, *
Dóminus Spíritus Sanctus.
Et tamen non tres Dómini, *
sed unus est Dóminus.
Quia, sicut singillátim unamquámque persónam Deum ac Dóminum confitéri christiána veritáte compéllimur: *
ita tres Deos aut Dóminos dícere cathólica religióne prohibémur.
Pater a nullo est factus: *
nec creátus, nec génitus.

Fílius a Patre solo est:*
non factus, nec creátus, sed génitus.
Spíritus Sanctus a Patre et Fílio: *
non factus, nec creátus, nec génitus, sed procédens.

Unus ergo Pater, non tres Patres: unus Fílius, non tres Fílii: *
unus Spíritus Sanctus, non tres Spíritus Sancti.
Et in hac Trinitáte nihil prius aut postérius, nihil maius aut minus: *
sed totae tres persónae coaetèrnae sibi sunt et coaequáles.

Ita ut per ómnia, sicut iam supra dictum est, *
et únitas in Trinitáte, et Trínitas in unitáte veneránda sit.

Qui vult ergo salvus esse, *
ita de Trinitáte séntiat.
Sed necessárium est ad aetérnam salútem, *
ut incarnatiónem quoque Dómini nostri Iesu Christi fidéliter credat.
Est ergo fides recta ut credámus et confiteámur, *
quia Dóminus noster Iesus Christus, Dei Fílius, Deus et homo est.

Deus est ex substántia Patris ante saécula génitus: *
et homo est ex substántia matris in saéculo natus.

Perféctus Deus, perféctus homo: *
ex ánima rationáli et humána carne subsístens.
Aequális Patri secúndum divinitátem: *
minor Patre secúndum humanitátem.
Qui, licet Deus sit et homo, *
non duo tamen, sed unus est Christus. .

Unus autem non conversióne divinitátis in carnem, *
sed assumptióne humanitátis in Deum.

Unus omníno, non confusióne substántiae, *
sed unitáte persónae.

Nam sicut ánima rationális et caro unus est homo:
ita Deus et homo unus est Christus.

Qui passus est pro salúte nostra: descéndit ad ínferos: *
tértia die resurréxit a mórtuis.

Ascéndit ad coélos, sedet ad déxteram Dei Patris omnipoténtis: *
inde ventúrus est iudicáre vivos et mórtuos.
Ad cuius advéntum omnes hómines resúrgere habent cum corpóribus suis: *
et redditúri sunt de factis própriis ratiónem.

Et qui bona egérunt, ibunt in vitam aetérnam: *
qui vero mala, in ígnem aetérnum.

Haec est fides cathólica, *
quam nisi quisque fidéliter firmitérque credíderit, salvus esse non póterit.
Amen.

Heresy Podcast 3: The Third Century

This podclass tackles the heresies of the third century including Sabellius (founder of Modalism), Paul of Samosata (forerunner of the Adoptionist heresy), Manes (founder of Manichaeism that temporarily ensnared St. Augustine early on in his conversion) and  finally we consider two semi-heretics, Tertullian and Origin.   On the blog that has photos, you can see Tertullian above.  Below is Man-E-Faces, a good symbol of the Sabellian or Modalist heresy.  The third century heresies as outline by St. Alphonsus Liguori in the 18th century can be found on this link.

Heresy Podclass 2: The Second Century

In this “podclass” we’re going to see why Marcionism is the most prolific heresy today. Marcion was a second century heretic who taught that the God of the Old Testament was a different God from the New Testament. The section of St. Alphonsus Liguori’s book can be found here. Scroll down to #8 to read about Marcion.

Correction.  I should have said the following:  “St. Cyril of Alexandria taught that St. Paul wrote the New Testament book of Hebrews in Hebrew and St. Luke translated it to the Greek.”

Heresy Podclass 1: The First Century

This is the first in a new series called “Heresies and their Remedies.” We start with the heresies that popped up in the first century and were tackled by St. John the Beloved. These series will probably be released every other Tuesday. One reference for this class will be a book by St. Alphonsus Liguori called History of Heresies and Their Refutation.  NB The music bumpers for this podclass will be a funny fail at the “2001 Space Odyssey” because I thought it was appropriate for how heresy always starts glorious, but proves ugly.

Annulments Sermon

This sermon is about the beauty of marriage by way of the pain of annulments, and it is sure to be controversial. It might sound excessively traditional, but it is based on a key line that I forgot to quote from Pope John Paul II. He said that for a declaration of nullity to be granted, run-of-the-mill difficulties in marriage were not sufficient, but rather, “real incapacity is to be considered [for an annulment analysis] only when an anomaly of a serious nature is present”—Pope John Paul II’s exhortation on Canon 1095, written on 25 February 1987. One example of “an anomaly of a serious nature” would be the couple’s decision during engagement to have no children. That is, they were not just using the Pill (albeit an abortifacient that kills and also a mortal sin for both spouses in the marriage), but rather they had an absolute refusal to be open to children.   Such an inherent rejection of children from the wedding day onwards would render an attempted-Catholic marriage nothing (null) from the get-go.  Another example of this key line by Pope John Paul II on a declaration of nullity only being considered for “an anomaly of a serious nature” would be the implicit and hidden rejection of the exclusivity of one spouse (usually an unrevealed rejection of monogamy from engagement onwards.) This would have to be something more grave than even several acts of infidelity during the marriage. Again, infidelity (including pornography, see Matthew 5:28) is mortal sin, but it doesn’t break the bond made at the altar, for only death can break that bond.  If a man got married, secretly planning to leave his wife in a few years, this marriage should probably be retroactively declared “null” by the Tribunal.  (The Tribunal is the marriage arm of a Catholic diocese.)

The point is that ordinary arguments or even lack-of-happiness in a Catholic marriage does not warrant an investigation as to whether there was lack of due discretion in the formation of a Catholic wedding bond. The bond was indeed ratified at the words of the couple at the altar on their wedding day; those bonds were consummated several hours later at the hotel. This bond is to be favored by canon lawyers and priests, without any excessive retroactive analysis of the internal disposition of the two spouses during their engagement unless they are highly unusual Catholics, unless there is “an anomaly of a serious nature” as Pope John Paul II wrote regarding Canon 1095 on 25 February 1987. I have known such highly unusual Catholics whose attempt at marriage does indeed fit the bill of being “an anomaly of serious nature.” They probably deserved their attempted marriage to be declared null, and they received it. However, the thrust of this sermon is to push against the sheer numbers that make a mockery of marriage and do not favor the bond of even the best Catholic families. Trust me: I side with all the Popes and saints of history. Most importantly, I side with Jesus Christ who said: “Everyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a woman divorced from her husband commits adultery.”—St. Luke 16:18. The photo is a picture I took at St. John the Baptist narthex in New Orleans, one of the many saints who died defending the bond of marriage.  This sermon was released on the feast of his decapitation.

Mary’s Role in Pentecost

Covered in this podcast is a wide range of Catholic issues, from the first Pentecost to the charismatic movement today, to St. Maximilian Kolbe. We’ll especially consider Mary’s role against demons and the syllabus of errors in modern times.

Special thanks again to the Benedictine Nuns of Mary Queen of Apostles for allowing me to use their music as the bumpers to my iTunes sermons and podcasts.